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>Plagiarisms


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Plagiarisms



* Dixon & Southern 1992 p48-49: "During the first century AD the sword was worn on the right side of the body, as numerous cavalry tombstones of the period show.  From the second century onwards, however, the spatha started to be worn on the left side, although not exclusively so."
* Fields ill. Hook 2006 p16: "The spatha was worn on the right side of the body, as numerous cavalry tombstones show, suspended from a waist belt or baldric whose length could be adjusted by a row of metal buttons.  From the 2nd century onwards, however, the spatha started to be worn on the left side, although not exclusively so."


* Goodwin ed. Basso 1971 p17: "The Western Apache drew a sharp distinction between 'raiding' (literally: 'to search out enemy property') and 'warfare' ('to take death from an 'enemy'). 
* Hook & Hook 1987 p12: "The Apache drew a sharp distinction between warfare and raiding.  Their respective aims were summarized by the Western Apache words for each: raiding was 'to search out enemy property', while war meant 'to take death from an enemy'."


* Hassig 1988



* Robinson 1967 p109: "The Sikhs used oval helmets so that their long hair could hang more easily at the back of the head.  Or if they wished to keep their hair in a bun on top of the head, they wore a helmet with a broad, raised crest shaped like a French 'Cap of Liberty' to house it."
* Paul 1995 p96: "The Sikhs used oval helmets so that their long hair could hang more easily at the back.  Or, if they kept their hair in a bun on top of the head, they wore a helmet with a broad, raised crest."


* Rosa 2002 p98: "They were used to put injured animals out of misery, but they were rarely used in range wars and other conflicts.  Revolvers were handy for dealing with snakes and rabid animals, and with a really lucky shot could help to put meat on the dinner table.  Revolvers were also worn for reasons of status, but the truth is that they were also heavy and got in the way."
* Boorman 2004 p107-108: "They were used to put injured animals out of misery, were handy for dealing with snakes and rabid animals, and with a really lucky shot could help to put meat on the dinner table.  Revolvers were also worn for reasons of status, but the truth is that they were also heavy and got in the way."


*  Sekunda ill. Hook 1998 p29-30: "When Lakedaimonian battelfield tactics started to develop in the 5th century, the Corinthian helmet was replaced.  Good vision and hearing in the phalanx were becoming more important as increasingly complex manoeuvres were executed at the signal of the trumpet.  Consequently, a new type of helmet, the pilos-helmet, was adopted at the same time as the cuirass was abandoned.
"...  The pilos-helmet repeated the shape of the felt pilos cap in bronze.  Presumably pilos caps were sometimes worn under the helmet for comfort, giving rise to helmets of this shape.  Once adopted by the Lakedaimonian army, it became as much a Lakonian symbol as the crimson exomis, and was copied by many armies both inside and outside the Peloponnesian League."
* Fields 2013 p143: "When Spartan tactics started to develop in the fifth century BC, the Corinthian helmet, which completely enclosed the wearer's head, was replaced.  Good vision and hearing in the Spartan phalanx were becoming more important as increasingly complex manoeuvres were executed, thus making the wearing of a Corinthian helmet a mix blessing [SIC].  Consequently, a new type of helmet offering far less facial protection, the pilos, was adopted by Spartan hoplites.  The word pilos literally means 'felt', and is applied to a number of articles made of that material.  Felt caps were called piloi, and they came in a number of regional variants, distinguished by shape.  Arrian and Pollux mention Lakonian piloi.  They were conical in shape and slightly rounded at the point -- of the type commonly worn by the Spartan heroes, the heavenly twins Castor and Pollux.
"The pilos-helmet repeated the shape of the felt cap in bronze.  Once adopted by the Spartan army, it became as much a Spartan symbol as the crimson exomis, and was copied by many states both inside and outside its alliance, what is often called nowadays the Peloponnesian League."


* Sekunda ill. Hook 1998 p31: "There was nothing unusual in Lakedaimonian swords until the 5th century, when they began to get shorter.  By c.425-400 they had become exceedingly short, like daggers, as is testified to by numerous literary passages. ...
"The sword was probably shortened to make it handier in the crush which ensued when two phalanx lines met.  Normal Greek swords were medium-sized cut and thrust weapons.  When the spear was broken, they would normally be used overhand to slash at the head of the opponent.  The sword was shortened in order to encourage the Lakedaimonian warrior to use more effective thrusting attacks at the trunk and groin of his opponent."
* Fields 2013 p143-144: "There was nothing unusual in Spartan swords until the fifth century BC, when they began to get shorter and straighter.  By the Peloponnesian War they had become exceedingly short, like daggers, as is clear from the representational evidence depicting Spartan hoplites. ..."
"... The sword was probably shortened to make it handier in the crush, which ensued when two phalanxes collided.  ... [T]he Greek sword was normally a medium-sized, one-edged slashing weapon, the kopis.  When the spear was splintered, it would be employed overhand to hack and slash at the head and shoulders of the opponent.  In Sparta, however, the sword was shortened in order to encourage the Spartan hoplite to get nice and close and employ a more effective underarm thrust against the vulnerable groin region of his opponent."



* Stone 1934 p: "SANGU. A Central Indian spear made entirely of steel. It has a long triangular or quadrangular head."
* Tirri 2000 p281: "SANGU is a term for a central Indian steel spear with a long triangular or four-sided head."


* Stone 1934 p: "SHAIL. Rajput, a lance with a bamboo shaft [...]"
* Tirri 2000 p281: "SHAIL is a term for the Rajput lance, usually with a bamboo shaft."


* Whitlock 1976 p81: "There seem ..., at least in later times, to have been bands of full-time mercenaries known as holkans, under the command of permanent leaders." 
* Wise ill. McBride 1980 p32: "There seem ..., at least in later times, to have been bands of full-time mercenaries known as holkans, who fought under permanent leaders."